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Five Ohio State Doctoral Students Earn Fulbright-Hays Dissertation Research Funding

Five doctoral candidates from The Ohio State University have been awarded the prestigious Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad (DDRA) Fellowship by the U.S. Department of Education, International and Foreign Language Education (IFLE) office. John Bundschuh, Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, Ashlee Dauphinais, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Katherine Fitzgerald, Department of Comparative Studies, Barbara Y. Roth, Department of Political Science, and Nathan Young, Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, are the recipients of the fellowship.

These Fulbright-Hays DDRA awards represent more than $220,000 in research funding for 2019-2020. Nationwide across all disciplines 100 Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowships were awarded. With five recipients, Ohio State ranks third in the nation for total awards - tied with Michigan State and University of California, Berkeley and behind only the University of Wisconsin (seven awards) and Cornell University (six awards). 

John Bundschuh - Tense, Aspect, and Modality in the Creation of Narrative Structure in Japanese Kundokugo Buddhist Texts

John Bundschuh

John Bundschuh, Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, will conduct research for his dissertation in Japan for seven months examining the topic Tense, Aspect, and Modality in the Creation of Narrative Structure in Japanese Kundokugo Buddhist Texts. 

Bundschuh's project examines how Buddhist sutras written in Chinese were rendered in Japanese during the Heian period (794–1185 C.E.) using techniques of narrative studies and historical linguistics. Bundschuh will conduct archival research to determine how differing grammatical markers of time create narrative frames in Buddhist discourse and address how the use of these markers varied among differing Buddhist sects and changed throughout the period. More broadly, his research contributes to the conceptions of how stylistic choice distinguishes different perspectives and distance in narration and sheds new light on the rhetorical role of Japanese grammar in presenting the stories within Buddhist texts to a Japanese audience.

Bundschuh earned his Bachelor of Arts in linguistics and Asian studies from Tulane University (2009) and Master of Arts in linguistics from Tulane University (2010). His faculty advisor is Charles Quinn.

Ashlee Dauphinais - Linguistic Practices among Women with Turner Syndrome in Brazil

Ashlee DauphinaisAshlee Dauphinais, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, will conduct her dissertation research in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, for 12 months studying Linguistic Practices among Women with Turner Syndrome in Brazil

Dauphinais will examine the topic of linguistic practices and the construction of womanhood among individuals with Turner Syndrome (TS), one of the most common chromosomal intersex conditions. She will be affiliated with the Applied Linguistics program and the School of Medicine at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. Her project examines linguistic variation and other discursive practices to explore how TS individuals mitigate personal and group identity in light of larger discourses of womanhood and femininity in Brazil. Employing mixed qualitative and quantitative methodologies, Dauphinais will conduct an in-depth ethnography of Brazilian TS communities and doctors to understand how TS individuals negotiate their embodied gendered identity and medical treatment through language. More broadly, her research facilitates insights on intersections of language, the body, health practices, and social conceptions of gender for scholars and medical practitioners.

Dauphinais earned her Bachelor of Arts in Spanish and international relations from Saint Joseph's University (2010) and Master of Arts in linguistics from the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras (2014). Her academic advisor is Anna Babel.

Katherine Fitzgerald - No Pure Lands: The Contemporary Buddhism of Tibetan Lay Women

Kati Fitzgerald

Katherine Fitzgerald, Department of Comparative Studies, will conduct her dissertation research in China for six months investigating No Pure Lands: The Contemporary Buddhism of Tibetan Lay Women.

Fitzgerald posits that the Buddhism of female lay practitioners—often labeled animistic, pagan, superstitious, non-philosophical, shamanistic—is in fact constituent of modern Tibetan Buddhism. Using ethnographic data collected in Nangchen, Yushu Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Qinghai Province, Fitzgerald argues for a definition of Tibetan Buddhism founded in female lay practice. Her research seeks to (1) Understand the place of circumambulation and sacred space as aspects of Tibetan Buddhist practice and how these practices have been informed by migration; (2) Understand how mobility, both physical and imaginative, is a key aspect of contemporary Buddhist practice; and (3) Conceptualize how violence, both physical and emotional, is conceived of as a method for achieving enlightenment and an essential aspect of Buddhism.

Fitgerald earned her Bachelor of Arts in theatre and dramatic arts at Barnard College (2010) and Master of Arts in comparative studies at The Ohio State University (2015). Her faculty advisor is Hugh Urban.

Barbara Y. Roth - Settlement Social Norms and Conflict Migration in Bosnia

Barbara Roth

Barbara Y. Roth, Department of Political Science, will conduct research in Bosnia and Herzegovina for 12 months examining the Settlement Social Norms and Conflict Migration in Bosnia

The events that aggregate into an armed conflict are the result of countless individual decisions that simultaneously form and are shaped by complex system dynamics. While early research tended to focus on outcomes and processes at the conflict-level, recent work has uncovered the vital importance of studying conflict microdynamics and their emergent properties. This project addresses a key gap in this literature by examining the vastly under-theorized component of civilian responses to war. Using archival and ethnographic evidence from rural Bosnia and Herzegovina, this project explores how local spatial trajectories of conflict and settlement-level social norms shaped civilian responses to war and migration decision-making in rural areas. It uses comparative case studies of Orašje, Raštani, and Vikići to examine the role of local practices of Komšiluk or neighborhood sociality and its constituent social figurations in migration decisions and outcomes. By exploring the social dynamics which caused these otherwise similar settlements to display such divergent mobility patterns, it facilitates a deeper understanding of both forced migration and contemporary Southeast Europe.

Roth earned her Bachelor of Arts in media studies and political science from the Free University of Berlin, Germany (2014) and a Master of Arts in political science from the University of Utah (2016). Her faculty advisor is Amanda Robinson.

Nathan Young, Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures

Nathan Young

Nathan Young, Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, will conduct research in Turkey for six months investigating Modernization’s Other: Nostalgia for Village Life in Turkey.

Young's research investigates the relationship between models of society and nation-building. He will examine nostalgia for village life in the Turkish imaginary, identifying how it shapes and is shaped by modernization narratives, and reveals ways individuals conceptualize self and nation. Young's research asks: to what extent are Turkey’s development and urbanization narratives dialectically constructed with village life nostalgia? How do such sentiments influence lifestyle choices and identity projects? Is nostalgia employed to cope with urban life and national traumas? Through interviews and participant observation in and around Ankara, Young will uncover nostalgic rural-life affinities and pursuits and apply them to interpret phenomena in Turkey, including: urban-rural dynamics, hometown loyalty and disillusionment with “modernity.” 

Young earned a Bachelor of Arts in literature and mathematics at Claremont McKenna College (1993), a Master of Arts in theology at Fuller Theological Seminary (2008) and a Master of Arts in Turkish folklore at Ege University (2014). His academic advisor is Morgan Liu.

Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad (DDRA) Fellowship Program

The Office of International Affairs administers the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad (DDRA) Fellowship Program for The Ohio State University, and grant competitions are held annually. Doctoral candidates interested in applying for the Fellowship for the 2019 competition must contact Fulbright-Hays program director, Joanna Kukielka-Blaser, kukielka-blaser.1@osu.edu.